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Farming

  • Stray seeds, odd fruit, a breed unto itself

    My neighboring vendor at the Belknap Farmers’ Market, Janet Haggerty, shared some little cherry tomatoes with me last week that came from a stray seedling. The little tomatoes where a dull yellow and about the size of a gooseberry.  They were fantastic.
    I remember meeting a woman at the State Fair years ago that brought in a similar bag of tiny tomatoes. She said the plants were popping up here and there in the garden, not like anything she had ever planted.  

  • Producers are encouraged to consider risk protection coverage before fall crop sales deadline

    Farm Service Agency Administrator Val Dolcini encourages producers to examine the available U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) crop risk protection options, including federal crop insurance and Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) coverage, before the sales deadline for fall crops.

  • USDA adds more eligible commodities for Farm Storage Facility Loans

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Administrator Val Dolcini announces that the Farm Storage Facility Loan (FSFL) program, which provides low-interest financing to producers to build or upgrade storage facilities, will now include dairy, flowers and meats as eligible commodities.
    “For 15 years, this program has provided affordable financing, allowing American farmers and ranchers to construct or expand storage on the farm,” said Dolcini.

  • Phase I applications due Aug. 14

    The Harrison County Ag Development Board reminds everyone who is applying for cost share dollars, to remember the deadline for the applications is Aug. 14. The applications must be turned back in by 4:30 p.m.
    The application process began on July 27 and several applications have already been turned in. Remember that cost share funds will amount to $3,000 max in 2015.  Stop by the Extension Office and pick-up an application.

  • Wilt caused by more than heat in vegetable patch

    The garden is languishing this year but ironically there is one perennial problem that doesn’t seem to be bothering my squash and zucchini: the squash vine borer.   The early summer rains stunted my yellow squash; my Romanesco zucchini ‘Gadzukes’ is really the only variety producing and there seem to be no signs of wilt on the horizon!  

  • It’s been a bad season for tomatoes

    Everyone is talking about what a terrible season it has been for vegetable farming.
    My garden is growing weeds while the onions rot and the tomatoes languish on the vine. The rain has made for soggy ground that starves annual plants of oxygen.  
    So what are we to do?  
    First and foremost this is a reminder of how important it is to build soil year after year to ensure good drainage for plants that would otherwise be starved of oxygen if they are trapped in soggy, clayey soils.  
    The rest is lies in our cultural practices.

  • Consider safety with flooded garden produce

    It seems we have experienced flooding this summer that has impacted nearly every county in the state. These floods have raised questions on how to deal with vegetable gardens that have been covered with flood water. The following information was gathered from the University of Kentucky’s Dr. Sandra Bastin, Extension Food and Nutrition Specialist; Dr. John Strang, UK Extension Fruit and Vegetable Specialist; and from University of Michigan Cooperative Extension.

  • USDA accepting more farmland for wildlife habitat in Kentucky

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Kentucky Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director John W. McCauley announces that an additional 1,100 acres of agricultural land in Kentucky is eligible for funding for wildlife habitat restoration.

  • Phase I Program begins July 27

    The Harrison County Ag Development Board (Phase I) reminds all farmers that the sign-up for the 2015 Phase I program will begin on Monday, July 27. The applications can be picked up at the Harrison County Extension Office and all applications must be returned to the Extension Office no later than Friday, Aug. 14 at 4:30 p.m.
    Available programs are similar to previous years. You can go on line at www.agpolicy.ky.gov and observe all the programs and rules you can participate in. If you have any questions give our office a call at 859-234-5510.

  • Harrison students attend Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders

     Harrison County High School juniors Travis Fry and Gracie Furnish recently returned home from Kentucky Farm Bureau’s Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders (IFAL). Fry, Furnish and 44 other high school students from around the state attended the five-day summer leadership conference, held June 21-25 at the University of Kentucky.

    An identical IFAL conference was also held June 14-18 at Murray State University for an additional 48 students.