• USDA commodity loans available to Kentucky producers

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Kentucky Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director, John W. McCauley reminds producers that USDA offers interim financing at harvest time to help producers meet cash flow needs without having to sell commodities when market prices are at harvest-time lows. The programs, known as Marketing Assistance Loans (MALs) and Loan Deficiency Payments (LDPs), were authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill for the 2014-2018 crop years.

  • Producers have until Sept. 30 to sign up for ARC/PLC and MPP-Dairy programs

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Administrator Val Dolcini reminds farmers and ranchers that they have until Sept. 30 to enroll in several key Farm Bill safety net programs – Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC), Price Loss Coverage (PLC) and the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy).
    ARC and PLC programs trigger financial protections for agricultural producers when market forces cause substantial drops in crop prices or revenues.

  • National Junior Angus Show
  • Jim Claypool Art and Conservation Writing contest announced

    The Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts, in partnership with the Kentucky Farm Bureau, announces the beginning of the 2015 Jim Claypool Art and Conservation Writing Contest titled, “The Wild Side of Kentucky.”  
    Students across the state will use a wildlife theme to create art and essays to urge their audience toward good wildlife conservation practices. County, area and state winners will be chosen through the local conservation districts.

  • Stray seeds, odd fruit, a breed unto itself

    My neighboring vendor at the Belknap Farmers’ Market, Janet Haggerty, shared some little cherry tomatoes with me last week that came from a stray seedling. The little tomatoes where a dull yellow and about the size of a gooseberry.  They were fantastic.
    I remember meeting a woman at the State Fair years ago that brought in a similar bag of tiny tomatoes. She said the plants were popping up here and there in the garden, not like anything she had ever planted.  

  • Producers are encouraged to consider risk protection coverage before fall crop sales deadline

    Farm Service Agency Administrator Val Dolcini encourages producers to examine the available U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) crop risk protection options, including federal crop insurance and Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) coverage, before the sales deadline for fall crops.

  • USDA adds more eligible commodities for Farm Storage Facility Loans

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Administrator Val Dolcini announces that the Farm Storage Facility Loan (FSFL) program, which provides low-interest financing to producers to build or upgrade storage facilities, will now include dairy, flowers and meats as eligible commodities.
    “For 15 years, this program has provided affordable financing, allowing American farmers and ranchers to construct or expand storage on the farm,” said Dolcini.

  • Phase I applications due Aug. 14

    The Harrison County Ag Development Board reminds everyone who is applying for cost share dollars, to remember the deadline for the applications is Aug. 14. The applications must be turned back in by 4:30 p.m.
    The application process began on July 27 and several applications have already been turned in. Remember that cost share funds will amount to $3,000 max in 2015.  Stop by the Extension Office and pick-up an application.

  • Wilt caused by more than heat in vegetable patch

    The garden is languishing this year but ironically there is one perennial problem that doesn’t seem to be bothering my squash and zucchini: the squash vine borer.   The early summer rains stunted my yellow squash; my Romanesco zucchini ‘Gadzukes’ is really the only variety producing and there seem to be no signs of wilt on the horizon!  

  • It’s been a bad season for tomatoes

    Everyone is talking about what a terrible season it has been for vegetable farming.
    My garden is growing weeds while the onions rot and the tomatoes languish on the vine. The rain has made for soggy ground that starves annual plants of oxygen.  
    So what are we to do?  
    First and foremost this is a reminder of how important it is to build soil year after year to ensure good drainage for plants that would otherwise be starved of oxygen if they are trapped in soggy, clayey soils.  
    The rest is lies in our cultural practices.