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Church

  • Death has lost its sting

    About six or so years ago, I met a man who said he saw a dead man raised to life.
    The dead man’s name was Bob and the man who told me about it said God had told him to go to Bob’s house to pray.
    He didn’t know Bob had died until he got there, but since God had told him to pray, he figured he better do it. So, he asked Bob’s wife if he could see him.
    The man had seen death before, and Bob was dead. Even so, the man started praying because God had told him so.

  • Where is God?

    Every time my town has an event that draws a lot of people, from a Saturday’s farmer’s market to a festival or parade, a local pastor and members of his church are there, handing out gospel tracts.

    During the St. Patrick’s Day parade, Brother Troy was on the corner, handing out tracts.

  • Church News

    ANTIOCH MILLS CHRISTIAN CHURCH

    The Walking Dead have a message for you: 

  • Church News

    BOYERS CHAPEL
    Boyers Chapel will be having a Sunrise service April 8 at 7 a.m. with breakfast to follow.
    Sunday school will begin at 10 a.m. There will be no 11 a.m. service.
    Everyone is invited to attend. Trey Brennan is the pastor.

    CONNERSVILLE
    CHRISTIAN
    AWANA (a children’s program) will be held every Sunday from 5:45-7:15 p.m. for ages three years to sixth grade at Connersville Christian Church. All children are welcome.

    FIRST UNITED
    METHODIST

  • Scarred for life

    All this past week I’ve been talking to people with scars for a series of stories that I wrote for the newspaper where I work.
    I got the idea from a photographer I heard on the radio, talking about a series of photos he had done of people’s scars.
    He said that every scar tells a story.
    When I was 9, I bent down to say “hi” to Sam Lang’s Basset hound and it jumped up and bit my face, tearing a hole from the right edge of my lip to my chin.

  • We are all so loved

    Oh, to be loved as Dennis Williams is loved!
    A week or so ago on a Sunday afternoon, two women I don’t know knocked on my door.
    They said they knew me, or at least knew me through my writing and somehow thought I could help them find their friend Dennis.
    They knew enough about me to deduce that I owned my own home and searched the county property appraiser’s website to find my address so they could come and see me in person because they were that desperate to find their friend who was missing.

  • Church News

    CONNERSVILLE CHRISTIAN
    AWANA (a children’s program) will be held every Sunday from 5:45-7:15 p.m. for ages three years to sixth grade at Connersville Christian Church. All children are welcome.

    ST. JAMES AME
    Cynthiana NA Group Hope for Tomorrow meets Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 6 p.m. at St. James AME Church, 312 W. Pleasant St. Annex. Speaker meeting last Thursday of each month.
    For more information or questions call Blaine at 859-298-1171.

    RADIO MINISTRY

  • Church News

    ELMARCH UNITED
    METHODIST
    The Scholarship Fellowship will be held March 11 at 6 p.m. at Elmarch United Methodist Church. Please support this special service and fund.

    ST. JAMES A.M.E.
    The Rev. Jimmy Thomas of Lexington will be at St. James A.M.E. Church on March 11 at 3:30 p.m. for a worship service. Sponsored by the spring rally committee.

    VICTORY BAPTIST
    Victory Baptist Church will be holding a special program on March 11.

  • Playing soul catch-up

    In a story told by Rabbi Kushner, a group of tourists on an African safari hired several native porters to carry their supplies for them. After three days the porters announced they needed to stop and rest for a day.
    They didn’t appear to be tired, so the tourists asked why the need to stop. The porters said, “We are not tired, but we have walked too far too fast and now we must wait for our souls to catch up to us.”
    I totally get that. I run and run and work and life zips by and my soul gets left behind in the dust.

  • Project Linus brings a sense of security and warmth to hospitalized children

    With every stitch, Mary Ann Upton remembers. Five years ago, she watched her newborn grandson fight for his life. He was born with a heart defect that lead to open heart surgery when he was only three days old. In the midst of all the worry and pain, the local chapter of Project Linus brought the baby a blanket.
    “It’s put up now,” said the grandmother of five. “One day, maybe he’ll take it out and tell the story to his children. It really meant a lot. Hospitals can be so cold and impersonal. What Project Linus did was so good.”